Big Ridge Foray
Date: April 9-11, 2010 / Leaders: George Lanz and Whitey Hitchcock

Morels
  • Yellow morel (The Classic North American Yellow Morel as defined by Michael Kuo at mushroomexpert.com)
  • Black morel (The Classic North American Black Morel as defined by Michael Kuo at mushroomexpert.com)
  • Half-free morel (North American Half-Free Morels as defined by Michael Kuo at mushroomexpert.com)
  • The North American Deliciosa as defined by Michael Kuo at mushroomexpert.com
Fleshy Fungi
  • Pluteus cervinus (Faun mushroom)
  • Polyporus squamosus (Dryad’s saddle)
  • Flammulina velutipes (Velvet Foot)
Polypores (Non-Fleshy Fungi that grow on wood)
  • Cerrena unicolor
  • Daedaleopsis confragosa (thin walled maze polypore)
  • Polyporus conchifer (Little nest polypore)
  • Nigroporus vinosus
  • Stereum ostrea (False Turkey Tail)
  • Stereum rameale = S. complicatum (Crowded parchment)
  • Trametes versicolor (Turkey Tail)
  • Trametopsis cervina
  • Trichaptum biforme (Violet-toothed polypore)
Jelly Fungi
  • Tremella mesenterica
  • Exidia recisa
Cup Fungi
  • Urnula craterium (Devil’s urn – a stalked cup fungus)
Other Kinds of Fungi
  • Chlorociboria aeruginascens (blue-green staining in wood, not the fruiting bodies)
  • Scorias spongiosa (Beech aphid poop-eater)

The 17th annual George Lanz morel foray at Big Ridge State Park featured lovely spring sunshine, good fellowship, and some morels. After a long cold, snowy winter, spring arrived late this year which delayed the start of the morel season, but then it warmed up fast and became possibly too dry for a big fruiting. A total of 39 people took part, including some members of the Mushroom Club of Georgia and the SC Upstate Mushroom Society. A surprise participant was Jay Justice, field mycologist extraordinaire, who had made the long drive from Arkansas to join us.

George Lanz and Whitey Hitchcock led us on four forays between Friday afternoon and Sunday morning. The total number of morels found was between 500 and 600 – around one quarter of last year’s tally. But everyone found at least some. As usual the Black Morels predominated, with a few Half-frees, Yellows, and Deliciosas (the use of common names rather than scientific names is deliberate – see below).

On Friday evening, Whitey Hitchcock took us on a personal tour of his remarkable range of interests as a biologist and science teacher. He started with mushrooms – identifying them, painting them, and dyeing with them – and moved on to beetles, animal skulls and pelts, butterfly wings, and more.

On Saturday night we had a magnificent potluck dinner. Afterwards, Jay Justice gave a short talk about recent developments in morel taxonomy. Apparently DNA studies are showing that the names we have been using: Morchella esculenta, M. elata, M. semilibera, etc. are all wrong because those names belong to European species which are not the same as our American species, but new names have yet to be developed and agreed. In other words: it’s a mess.

Thanks to Jay, we have an unusually extensive species list for the foray (below). He was able to identify many desiccated polypores along with the few “fresh” fungi that can be found this early in the year.

Photo credits: Jay Justice and Chris Madden

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Morel Foray in Great Smoky Mountains National Park
Date: April 15, 2010 / Leaders: Charlotte Caplan

After some last-minute cancellations, 13 of us set off for the Big Creek area in the GSMNP on a bright sunny Thursday. The weather had continued dry since the Big Ridge foray the previous weekend and we had only modest hopes of finding morels.

Excitement immediately set in when two good yellow morels were spotted close to the car park, but the rest of the day yielded only a few more – perhaps 20-30 between all of us. Some young Dryad’s Saddle (Polyporus squamosus) was also collected.

The beauty of the setting and the carpet of yellow trillium and other woodland wildflowers under the stately tulip poplars made up for the lack of morels. It was worth the drive.


Morel Foray in Shelton Laurel
Date: April 24, 2010 / Leaders: Renate Rikkers

An invitation from Peter and Polly Gott to forage for morels and ramps on their beautiful Shelton Laurel (Madison County) property has been a highlight for the past several years. The Gotts recently placed their land under conservation easement, after 50 years of self-sufficient homesteading and meticulous care of the land, but continue their invitation to the AMC.

Limited to 20 members, everyone enjoyed the steep slopes with abundant poplar, carpets of wildflowers, and just enough morels to not go home empty-handed, especially new members out for their first morel hunt. A great potluck lunch with spectacular mountain views was consumed just before a storm moved in, getting us to pack up instead of heading out again in the afternoon.

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AMC’s first Edible Plants foray
Date: May 8, 2010 / Leaders: Terri Herrlein & Steve Peek

Saturday May 8th marked AMC’s first ever wild edible foray for other than fungi. Twenty-six folks gathered to forage for edible plants. The foray was led by Terri Herrlein and me, Steve Peek. Terri & I suggested this foray at the winter planning meeting. We believe a large number of our membership is interested in edibles in general as well as fungi specifically. The number of attendees suggests we were correct.

A short foray to the nearby soccer field edge yielded numerous wild edibles. Dandelion, garlic mustard, chickweed, plantains, sorrel, curly dock, lamb’s quarter and others made the edibles list and were gathered by many. Several plants from the wild pharmacy were gathered as well. Although we barely scratched the surface of the dozens of edibles available, the group was eager to learn and took samples for tasting and further study. Terri and I will continue to encourage others to “Eat you weeds” by pointing out other edibles during future forays.

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Holmes Educational State Forest Foray
Date: June 25, 2010 / Leaders: Jackie Schieb & Ginger Fisher

Species Common name Top 50
Amanita bisporigera Destroying Angel x
Amanita flavoconia Yellow Patches x
Amanita porphyria Purple-brown Amanita  
Amanita rubescens Blusher x
Armillaria mellea Honey  
Boletus auriflammeus    
Boletus ornatipes Ornate-stalked Bolete  
Boletus hortonii Corrugated Bolete  
Calostoma cinnabarina Gelatinous Stalked Puffball x
Cantharellus lateritius Smooth Chanterelle  
Clavariadelphus truncatus Flat-topped Fairy Club  
Clavulina cristata Crested Coral  
Clavulinopsis aurantiocinnabarina Orange Spindle coral  
Xerula megalospora Lesser Rooting Xerula  
Craterellus fallax Black Trumpet x
Daedaleopsis confragosa Thin-walled Maze Polypore x
Galiella rufa Hairy Rubber Cup  
Gyroporus castaneus Chestnut Bolete  
Lactarius camphoratus Fragrant Lactarius  
Lactarius corrugis Corrugated Lactarius  
Lactarius gerardii Gerard’s Lactarius  
Lactarius peckii Peck’s Lactarius x
Lactarius volemus Apricot Milk Cap x
Leotia lubrica Ochre Jelly Club  
Megacollybia platyphylla Platterful mushroom x
Omphalotus illudens Jack O Lantern x
Paxillus atromentosus Velvet-footed Paxillus x
Phylloporus rhodoxanthus Gilled Bolete x
Pleurotus ostreatus Oyster x
Russula pulchra Red Russula  
Russula virescens Green Quilt Russula x
Scleroderma citrinum Earthball x
Spathulariopsis velutipes Velvet-foot Fairy Fan  
Sparassis spathulata Cauliflower x
Stereum ostrea False Turkey Tail  
Strobilomyces floccopus Old Man of the Woods x
Trichoglossum hirsutum Velvety Black Earth Tongue  
Tylopilus plumbeoviolaceus Violet Bitter Bolete x
Xylaria magnoliae Magnolia Cone  
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Foray Location: Holmes Educational State Forest near Hendersonville, NC. Small groups broke out onto Talking Tree Trail, Soil and Water Trail, Demonstration Trail, and Wildcat Rock Trail. The foragers regrouped at noon at the Picnic shelter to enjoy lunch and identify mushrooms. Members worked on the identification process with Steve Peek & Arnie Cremer leading the process. Over 39 species were found, including 18 on the AMC Top 50 List, and two that were new to our cumulative foray species list: Galiella rufa, and Russula pulchra.

Foray Habitat and Weather: The foray trails included both flat and hilly trials in a mixed hardwood forest with a few firs and a boggy area. The location received rain over the previous few days, and the forest floor was wet. Temperatures were in the 80's.

Summary: Holmes Educational State Forest is a new foray site for the Asheville Mushroom Club. It offers a variety of trails, picnic sites, interesting educational exhibits, convenient restrooms, and an on-site Ranger Station. A total of 24 Asheville Mushroom Club members enjoyed finding Lactarius, Cantharellus (chanterelles), Amanita, Russula and other species varieties on this first summer foray of the 2010 season.

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Dupont State Forest Foray
Date: July 10, 2010 / Leaders: Ken McGill & Ginger Fisher

Species Common name Top 50
Amanita bisporigeraDestroying AngelY
Amanita brunnescensCleft-foot Amanita
Amanita cokeriCoker's AmanitaY
Amanita flavoconiaYellow PatchesY
Amanita parcivolvataFalse Fly Agaric
Amanita rubescensBlusherY
Boletus bicolorTwo-colored BoleteY
Boletus griseusGray Bolete
Cantharellus lateritiusSmooth Chanterelle
Cantharellus cibariusGolden ChanterelleY
Cantharellus cinnabarinusCinnabar ChanterelleY
Cantharellus minorSmall Chanterelle
Lactarius deceptivusDeceptive Milk Cap
Lactarius corrugisCorrugated Lactarius
Lactarius piperatusPeppery Milk Cap
Lactarius peckiiPeck's LactariusY
Lactarius subplinthogalusFragrant Lactarius
Lactarius subvellereus
Lactarius volemusApricot Milk CapY
Megacollybia platyphylla Platterful mushroom Y
Mycorrhaphium adustum Kidney-shaped Tooth  
Paxillus atrotomentosus Velvet Paxillus Y
Russula compacta Firm Russula Y
Russula virescens Green Quilt Russula Y
Scleroderma sp. (possibly S. cepa)    
Thelephora vialis    
Tremellodendron pallidum False Coral  
Tylopilus plumbeoviolaceus Violet Bitter Bolete Y
Tyromyces caesius    
Wolfina aurantiopsis    
Total Species: 30   14

Foray Location: Dupont State Forest near Brevard, NC. The foray route was along the trail called Holly Road starting opposite the Lake Imaging parking area.

Foray Habitat and Weather: The trail ran through a gently rolling forested area with sandy soils. Large, widely spaced white pines dominated the forest, with an understory of mixed hardwoods and pines. It had rained the day before the foray for the first time in about two weeks, so conditions were dry, despite some surface moisture.

Summary: Ten members and one dog took part in the foray, starting just after 10:00 AM. We regrouped in the parking area at noon, and walked to the picnic shelter at Lake Imaging where we set out our finds and ate lunch. Several members helped identify our finds and we soon had most of them labeled. Despite the dry conditions we found about 35 different species, of which we were able to identify 29. The most notable was the tough, pale yellow cup fungus Wolfina aurantiopsis (later confirmed by microscopic examination), an uncommon species and a first-time find for the club. We also collected and compared all three common white Lactarius species: L. piperatus, L. deceptivus, and L. subvellereus.


Dupont State Forest Foray
Date: August 7, 2010 / Leaders: Charlotte Caplan & Ken McGill

Species Common Name First AMC record Top 50
Boletes: Boletellus chrysenteroides   X  
  Boletellus russellii Russell's Bolete    
  Boletus atkinsonii   X  
  Boletus auripes      
  Boletus auriporus      
  Boletus frostii Frost's Bolete    
  Boletus illudens   X  
  Boletus innixus Clustered Brown Bolete    
  Boletus longicurvipes      
  Boletus pallidus Pale Bolete    
  Boletus roxanae      
  Boletus tenax      
  Bothia castanella = Boletinus castanella   X  
  Gyroporus castaneus Chestnut Bolete    
  Heimioporus betula Shaggy-stalked Bolete   X
  Leccinellum albellum      
  Leccinellum rugosiceps      
  Phylloporus rhodoxanthus Gilled Bolete   X
  Retiboletus griseus = Boletus griseus Gray Bolete    
  Retiboletus ornatipes = Boletus ornatipes Ornate-stalked Bolete    
  Strobilomyces strobilaceus = S. floccopus     X
  Tylopilus plumbeoviolaceus Violet Bitter Bolete   X
  Tylopilus rubrobrunneus      
  Xanthoconium purpureum   X  
  Xanthoconium separans Lilac Bolete    
         
Others: Amanita abrupta Abrupt-bulbed Lepidella    
  Amanita banningiana Mary Banning's Slender Caesar    
  Amanita brunnescens Cleft Foot Amanita    
  Amanita flavoconia Yellow Patches   X
  Amanita gemmata complex Gemmed Amanita    
  Amanita multisquamosa   X  
  Amanita parcivolvata Ringless False Fly Agaric    
  Amanita rubescens (sensu auct. amer. Orient) The Blusher   X
  Amanita spreta Hated Amanita    
  Artomyces pyxidatus = Clavicorona pyxidata Crown-tipped coral    
  Calocera cornea Club-like Yellow Tuning Fork    
  Calostoma cinnabarina Gelatinous Stalked Puffball   X
  Cantharellus cibarius Chanterelle   X
  Cantharellus cinnabarinus Cinnabar Chanterelle   X
  Cantharellus ignicolor Flame-colored Chanterelle    
  Cantharellus persicinus Peach Chanterelle    
  Clavaria fusiformis = Clavulinopsis fusiformis Splindle-shaped Yellow Coral    
  Clitopilus prunulus The Miller    
  Coltricia cinnamomea Shiny Cinnamon Polypore    
  Conocybe lactea White Dunce Cap X  
  Cordyceps militaris Trooping Cordyceps    
  Cortinarius iodes Spotted Cort   X
  Cortinarius sanguineus Blood-red Cort    
  Crucibulum laeve White-egg Bird's Nest    
  Dacryopinax spathularia Fan-shaped Jelly X  
  Fistulina hepatica Beefsteak Polypore   X
  Fomitopsis cajanderi Rosy Conk    
  Gerronema strombodes = Chrysomphalina strombodes Golden-gilled Gerronema    
  Gymnopus subnudus      
  Hydnellum concrescens   X  
  Hydnellum spongiosipes Spongy-footed Tooth    
  Hygrocybe conica Witches hat    
  Hygrophoropsis aurantiacus False Chanterelle    
  Lactarius argillaceifolius      
  Lactarius camphoratus Fragrant Milk Cap    
  Lactarius chrysorheus      
  Lactarius corrugis Corrugated Milk Cap   X
  Lactarius deceptivus Deceptive Milky    
  Lactarius imperceptus      
  Lactarius maculatipes      
  Lactarius mutabilis   X  
  Lactarius peckii Peck's Milk Cap   X
  Lactarius subplinthogalus      
  Lactarius subvellereus      
  Lactarius subvernalis var. cokeri      
  Lactarius volemus Apricot Milk Cap   X
  Lactarius volemus var. flavus      
  Laetoporus cincinnatus White-pored Chicken    
  Leotia lubrica Jelly Baby    
  Marasmiellus opacus      
  Marasmius fulvoferrugineus      
  Megacollybia rodmani Broad Gill   X
  Micromphale foetidum Fetid Marasmius X  
  Mycorrhaphium adustum Kidney-shaped Tooth    
  Nolanea murraii = entoloma murraii Yellow Unicorn Entoloma    
  Panellus stipticus Luminescent Panellus    
  Phellodon niger var. alboniger Black Tooth X  
  Ramaria canescens   X  
  Ramaria concolor      
  Russula compacta Firm Russula   X
  Russula virescens Green-Quilt Russula   X
  Scleroderma citrinum Earth Ball   X
  Stereum ostrea False Turkey Tail    
  Stereum rameale = S. complicatum Crowded Parchment    
  Tapinella atrotomentosa = Paxillus atrotomentosus Velvet-footed Pax   X
  Thelephora vialis Vase Thelephore    
  Tremellodendron pallidum White False Coral    
  Tremellodendropsis semivestitum      
         
  Total Species: 93   13 19

Foray Location: Dupont State Forest near Brevard, NC. The foray started from the Guion Farm parking area and explored trails to the East and West of that area, including Shoal Creek Trail, Rifle Trail, and Poplar Trail

Foray Habitat and Weather: The trails are in gently rolling forest with sandy soils. Close to Guion Farm the forest is mainly a mature white pine plantation but beyond that it gives way to mixed hardwoods. The day was warm and humid. There had been above average temperatures and below average rainfall in the region in the previous few weeks. A pattern of scattered showers made it hard to say how much rain the foray area had received, but evidently there had been enough for a truly massive fruiting of Boletes, and many other species.

Summary: Twenty people and two dogs took part in the foray, starting just after 10:00 AM. To our delight, Dr. Coleman McCleneghan unexpectedly joined us just as we set off. Progress along the trails was slow – there were just too many boletes: projecting from roadside banks, beside the trails, in the woods, and a huge fruiting under the large oak trees right beside the picnic shelter! Only in the white pine forest were boletes largely missing. After two hours our baskets were overflowing and we regrouped at the picnic shelter where Andy and Jay set to work. Jay concentrated on the Boletes and Amanitas, while Andy and his student assistant Gerry Presley tackled the rest.

A total of 93 species were found and identified – a huge number for one day, reflecting both the excellent collecting conditions and the expertise of our mycologists. Jay Justice identified no less than 25 species of boletes – surely a club record. Lactarius (Milk Cap) species were also plentiful (14 species). Amanitas were varied (9 species) but not so plentiful; most specimens were young, suggesting that this genus had yet to peak. Thanks to Andy Methven, a number of small, usually overlooked species were identified. No less than 13 species, including 5 boletes, were new to AMC’s cumulative species list.

Jay later commented: “Most interesting to me were Bothia castanella and Tremellodendropsis semivestitum. I have only seen the first one maybe once or twice at the most before, and this was the first foray where I was able to positively identify the T. semivestitum.”

AMC’s cumulative species list (from 2005 to the present) now stands at 583. We could reach the 600 mark by the end this season.


Cataloochee Valley Camping Foray
Date: July 30 - August 1, 2010 / Leaders: Jackie Scheib, Coleman McCleneghan, Ginger Fisher & Dottie Musolf

Species Common Name Top 50 List
Amanita banningiana Mary Banning's Slender Caesar  
Amanita bisporigera Destroying Angel X
Amanita cokeri Coker's Amanita X
Amanita flavorubescens * Yellow Blusher  
Amanita jacksonii American Caesar  
"Amanita rubescens" The Blusher X
Amanita russuloides Russula-like Amanita  
Amanita volvata Volvate Amanita  
Boletus bicolor Two-colored Bolete X
Boletus hortonii Wrinkled Bolete  
Cantharellus ignicolor Flame-colored Chanterelle  
Clavulinopsis aurantiocinnabarina Orange Spindle coral  
Cordyceps militaris Trrooping Cordyceps  
Corinarius iodes Spotted Cort X
Cortinarius corrugatus    
Craterellus fallax Black Trumpet X
Crepidotus crocophyllus    
Daldinia concentrica Carbon Balls  
Fomes fomentarius Tinder Fungus  
Gerronema stromboides Golden Gill  
Gymnopus confluens Tufted Collybia  
Gyroporus castaneus Chestnut Bolete  
Hydnum repandum Hedgehog; Sweet Tooth X
Hygrocybe conica Witch's Hat  
Hygrocybe flavescens Golden Waxy Cap  
Hygrocybe subovina Brown Sugar Waxy cap  
Lactarius chrysorheus    
Lactarius corrugis Corrugated Milk Cap X
Lactarius croceus    
Lactarius luteolus Buff Fishy Milky  
Lactarius peckii Peck's Lactarius X
Lactarius pyrogalus Fire-milk Lactarius  
Lactarius subvellereus var. subdistans    
Leotia lubrica Jelly Baby; Ochre Jelly Club  
Lycoperdon perlatum Gem-studded Puffball X
Megacollybia platyphylla = M. rodmani Platterful Mushroom; Broad Gill X
Meripulus sumstinei Black-staining Polypore  
Panellus stipticus Luminescent Panellus  
Phylloporus rhodoxanthus Gilled Bolete X
Pleurotus ostreatus (complex) Oyster mushroom X
Pseudohydnum gelatinosum Jelly Tooth  
Russula virescens Green Quilt Russula X
Sarcodon piperatus *    
Sparrasis spathulata Cauliflower X
Strobilomyces floccopus = Strobilomyces strobilaceus Old Man of the Woods X
Stropharia hardii Hard's Stropharia  
Suillus luteus Slippery Jack  
Suillus pictus Painted Bolete X
Tylopilus plumbeoviolaceus Violet Bitter Bolete X
Xylaria polymorpha Dead Man's Fingers  
Total species 50 18
* first record for AMC    

Foray Location: Cataloochee Valley, Great Smokey Mountains National Park

Foray Habitat & Weather: Valley contains sections of virgin forest & lovely streams. Sights include wildlife such as elk re-introduced to the area in 2001, as well as many historic structures including Palmers Chapel and the Steve Woody house. Temperatures were moderate and some rain fell Saturday afternoon, evening, & into Sunday morning.

Summary: There were more people than we expected. About 15 members camped both nights and about 30 foraged on Saturday morning. We met at Palmers Chapel 9 AM where we were met by Andy Methven and 3 of his students. We broke into 3 groups with Jackie, Coleman, and Dottie and Ginger leading Saturday morning. Each group carried a GPS unit to record our finds contribute to the Great Smokey Mountain biodiversity inventory. Coleman and Jackie led another foray in the afternoon. There was a good variety of species graciously identified by Coleman, Steve Peek, & Jackie Scheib but not as much abundance as we usually find, due to the dry weather leading up to the foray this year. The Saturday evening potluck was delicious to say the least and Arnie Cramer saved the day by bringing his large rain shelter.

Were we joined by several members of other clubs and it was great to meet some fellow mushroomers. .htmer Cox did a fabulous photo array and CD – which he graciously e-mailed to all participants and so a big thank you to him.


Pink Beds Foray
Date: July 23-25, 2010 / Leaders: Charlotte Caplan, Arnie Cremer & Coleman McClenaghan

Species Common Name First Record for AMC Top 50
Amanita bisporigera = A. virosa Eastern Destroying Angel   Y
Amanita citrina Citron Amanita    
Artomyces pyxidatus = Clavicorona pyxidata Crown-tipped Coral    
Boletus aurantiosplendens   f  
Boletus bicolor Two-color Bolete   Y
Boletus hortonii Wrinkled Bolete    
Boletus morrisii Morris' Bolete    
Boletus ornatipes Ornate-stalked Bolete    
Boletus sensibilis      
Boletus subluridellus      
Boletus tenax   f  
Boletus vermiculosus   f  
Bulgaria inquinans Black Stud Fungus    
Calostoma cinnabarina Gelatinous Stalked Puffball;   Y
Cantharellus cibarius Golden Chanterelle   Y
Cantharellus cinnabarinus Cinnabar Chanterelle   Y
Cantharellus minor Small Chanterelle    
Chlorociboria aeruginascens Blue-green Wood Stain    
Clavariadelphus pistillaris      
Clavulina cristata Crested Coral    
Clavulinopsis aurantio- cinnabarina Orange Spindle Coral    
Clavulinopsis fusiformis Spindle-shaped yellow coral    
Clitocybe clavipes = Ampulloclitocybe clavipes Club-foot Clitocybe    
Clitopilus prunulus Sweetbread Mushroom; The Miller    
Cordyceps militaris ??      
Cordyceps ophioglossoides Goldenthread f  
Craterellus cornucopioides = C. Fallax Black Trumpet   Y
Crepidotus applanatus Flat Crep    
Cyathus striatus Fluted Bird's Nest    
Entoloma murrayi = Nolanea murrayi Yellow Unicorn Entoloma    
Entoloma strictius = Nolanea stricta      
Fistulina hepatica Beefsteak Polypore   Y
Gloeocantharellus purpurascens   f  
Gymnopus dryophilus = Collybia dryophila) Common Collybia; Oak-loving Collybia    
Gymnopus subnudus      
Hydnellum aurantiacum Orange tooth f  
Hydnellum suaveolens   f  
Hydnum umbilicatum Navel Hedgehog    
Hygrocybe calyptraeformis Pink Waxy Cap    
Hygrocybe marginata Orange-gilled Waxy Cap    
Hygrocybe subovina Brown Sugar Waxy Cap    
Lactarius chrysorheus      
Lactarius corrugis Corrugated Milk Cap   Y
Lactarius deceptivus Deceptive Milky    
Lactarius gerardii Gerard's Milk Cap    
Lactarius peckii Peck's Lactarius   Y
Lactarius piperatus Peppery Milk Cap    
Lactarius subplinthogalus      
Lactarius subvellereus      
Lactarius volemus Apricot Milk Cap   Y
Lactarius volemus var. flavus   f  
Laetiporus sulphureus Chicken of the Woods   Y
Leotia lubrica Jelly Baby; Ochre Jelly Club    
Marasmiellus opacus      
Marasmiellus preacutus   f  
Marasmius androsaceus   f  
Megacollybia rodmani = Megacollybia platyphylla Platterful mushroom; Broad Gill   Y
Meripilus sumstinei = Meripilus giganteus Black-staining Polypore    
Microporellus dealbatus      
Mycena inclanata Clustered Bonnet f  
Mycorrhaphium adjustum Kidney-shaped tooth    
Paxillus atromentosus = Tapinella atrotomentosus Velvet-footed Paxillus   Y
Otidia sp.      
Pleurotus ostreatus Oyster mushroom   Y
Polyporus elegans      
Pouzarella nodospora Hairy-stalked Entoloma f  
Ramaria araiospora      
Rhodocollybia maculata = Collybia maculata Spotted Collybia f  
Russula virescens Green-quilt Russula   Y
Sarcodon atroviridis      
Spathulariopsis velutipes = Spathularia velutipes Velvet-foot Fairy Fan    
Stereum ostrea False Turkey Tail    
Strobilomyces floccopus = Strobilomyces strobilaceus Old Man of the Woods   Y
Suillus pictus = Suillus spraguei Painted Bolete   Y
Thelephora vialis Vase Thelephore    
Trametes versicolor Turkey Tail   Y
Tremella mesenterica Witch's Butter    
Tremellodendron pallidum False Coral    
Trichaptum biforme Violet-toothed Polypore    
Trichoglossum sp. Earthtongue    
Tylopilus rubrobrunneus      
Tyromyces chioneus White Cheese Polypore    
Xeromphalina campanella Golden Trumpets    
Xerula megalospora      
Total: 84   13 18

Foray Location: Davidson River Valley near Brevard, NC. Foray routes included Pink Beds Loop, part of Sycamore Cove and Pressley Cove

Foray Habitat and Weather: All foray routes were in mixed forest, with some areas of mainly conifers (white pine and hemlock). Conditions were superficially moist, but rainfall in the previous month had been below normal for the area.

Summary: 24 AMC members, one MCG member, and two dogs took part in the foray. Ten of us camped at the North White Pine group camp, from Friday afternoon to Sunday morning. On Saturday everyone met at 9:00 AM at the Pink Beds picnic area (note: the shelters can now be reserved, for a fee) and collected along both arms of the Pink Beds loop. The far end of the loop is now an impassable swamp, possibly due to beaver activity. Back at the picnic shelter we had lunch and set about identifying our finds. After lunch, Coleman gave us a tour of the table, concentrating on identification to genus level. In the afternoon, we split into small groups to explore other sites in the Davidson River valley, meeting up again at the campsite, where some of us cooled off in the creek. It rained quite heavily in the early evening, but thanks to Arnie’s splendid canopy we stayed dry and enjoyed our potluck dinner.

Mushrooms, particularly the choice edibles, were not as plentiful as in previous years. Lactarius species were probably the most numerous, Boletes were thinly scattered, and Amanitas very sparse. However, many small species were collected, and the total tally was 84, with an impressive 81 identified to species level thanks to Coleman. Thirteen species were recorded for the first time on an AMC foray, including three unusual boletes: B. aurantiosplendens, B. tenax, and B. vermiculosus; two tooth fungi: Hydnellum aurantiacum and H. suaveolens; the Goldenthread Cordyceps, C. ophioglossoides, growing on a false truffle; Spotted Collybia, Rhodocollybia maculata; and an uncommon chanterelle relative: Gloeocantharellus purpurascens.


Foster’s Creek Foray
Date: August 14, 2010 / Leaders: Arnie Cremer

Species Common Name First AMC record Top 50
Amanita bisporigera Destroying Angel   x
Amanita brunnescens Cleft-foot Amanita    
Amanita flavoconia Yellow Patches   x
Amanita onusta Gunpowder Lepidella    
Amanita parcivolvata False Fly Agaric    
Amanita rubescens The Blusher   x
Boletus hortonii Corrugated Bolete    
Calostoma cinnabarina Gelatinous Stalked Puffball   x
Cantharellus cibarius Golden Chanterelle   x
Cantharellus cinnabarina Cinnabar Chanterelle   x
Cantharellus persicinus Peach Chanterelle    
Clavulinopsis aurantiocinnabarina Orange Spindle Coral    
Clavulinopsis corniculata Yellow Anter Coral    
Cordyceps militaris Trooping Cordyceps    
Cortinarius iodes Spotted Cort   x
Fistulina hepatica Beefsteak Polypore   x
Fomitopsis cajanderi Rosy Conk    
Ganoderma lucidum Ling Chih; Reishi    
Hydnellum scrobiculatum Rough Hydnellum    
Hydnellum spongiosipes Spongy-footed Tooth    
Hygrocybe conica Witches Hat    
Hypomyces lactifluorum Lobster   x
Lactarius allardii      
Lactarius corrugis Corrugated Milk Cap   x
Lactarius croceus      
Lactarius deceptivus Deceptive Milk Cap    
Lactarius gerardii Gerard's Milky   x
Lactarius peckii Peck's Lactarius   x
Lactarius piperatus Peppery Milk Cap    
Lactarius glaucescens Peppery Milk Cap x  
Lactarius subplinthogalus      
Lactarius volemus Apricot Milk Cap   x
Laetiporus sulphureus Chicken of the Woods   x
Megacollybia rodmani Broad Gill   x
Microglossum rufum Orange Earth Tungue    
Mycorrhaphium adustum Kidney-shaped Tooth    
Omphalotus illudens Jack O'Lantern   x
Onnia tomentosa = Inonotus tomentosus Wooly Vevet Polypore    
Phaeolus schweinitzii Dyers Polypore    
Phlebia incarnata = Merulius incarnatus Coral Pink Phlebia    
Pleurotus ostreatus Oyster   x
Pluteus cervinus Fawn Mushroom   x
Psathyrella delineata Wrinkled Cap Psathyrella    
Retiboletus ornatipes = Boletus ornatipes Ornate-stalked Bolete    
Rozites caperata The Gypsy    
Russula crustosa      
Russula compacta Firm Russula   x
Russula heterophylla   x  
Russula virescens Green Quilt Russula   x
Sarcodon imbricatus = Hydnum imbricatum Scaly Tooth    
Scleroderma citrinum Common Earthball   x
Sparassis crispa Cauliflower    
Stereum ostrea False Turkey Tail   x
Strobilomyces floccopus Old Man of the Woods   x
Suillus americanus Chicken Fat Suillus    
Suillus pictus Painted Suillus   x
Thelephora vialis      
Trametes versicolor Turkey Tail   x
Tremellodendron pallidum      
Tylopilus plumbeoviolaceus Violet Bitter Bolete   x
Tyromyces chioneus White Cheese Polypore    
Xerula furfuracea Rooting agaric   x
Total Species: 62     27

Foray Location: Foster’s Creek, starting from the trailhead and exploring trails to the north and south.

Foray Habitat and Weather: The trails run through a range of forest types including hardwoods, mixed hardwoods and conifers, and areas of primarily white pine. There are moist areas close to creeks and dryer ridges. The day was warm and humid. There had been above average temperatures and slightly below average rainfall in the region in the previous few weeks, but conditions seemed moist and a good variety of fungi were fruiting.

Summary: Eleven members took part in the foray, hunting from about 10:00 AM to shortly after noon. We found and identified 62 species – a very good total for a foray without the expertise of a professional mycologist. Edibles collected included small quantities of Chanterelles, Lobsters, Cauliflower, Chicken of the Woods, Beefsteak Polypore, and some boletes, but by far the most abundant edibles were the Apricot and Corrugated Milk Caps – prime specimens of these seemed to be everywhere. We found two species that were new to the Club’s cumulative species list: Lactarius glaucescens, distinguished from L. piperatus (Peppery Milk Cap) by latex that slowly stains green, and the yellow-green Russula heterophylla, confirmed later by spore-print color and spore size.


Chimney Rock State Park Foray
Date: August 22, 2010 / Leaders: Charlotte Caplan, Mycologist: Dr. Coleman McCleneghan

Species Common Name First AMC record Top 50
Agaricus campestris Meadow Mushrooms   x
Amanita jacksonii American Caesar's Mushroom    
Amanita rubescens The Blusher   x
Amanita sp      
Boletus auriporus      
Boletus bicolor Two-colored Bolete   x
Boletus frostii Frost's Bolete    
Boletus illudens = xerocomus illudens      
Boletus longicurvipes      
Boletus pallidus Pale Bolete    
Boletus reticulatus   f  
Boletus sp. (close to B. satanas)      
Boletus sp. (close to B. subluridellus; almond-scented)      
Boletus subvelutipes Red-mouth Bolete    
Ceratiomyxa sp. (slime mold) f  
Clytocybe (Clitopilus?) prunulus The Miller    
Crepidotus applanatus Flat Crep    
Crucibulum laeve Common Bird's Nest   x
Cyathus striatus Fluted Bird's nest    
Fomitopsis sp.      
Galiella rufa Hairy Rubber Cup    
Ganoderma lucidum Ling Chih; Reishi    
Gerronema strombodes Golden-gilled Gerronema    
Gymnopus luxurians      
Gymnopus subnudus      
Gymnopus sp.      
Lactarius chrysorheus      
Lactarius croceus      
Lactarius hygrophoroides Hygrophorus Milk Cap    
Leccinum holopus      
Lepiota sp.      
Leucocoprinus cepaestipes = Lepiota cepaestipes Onion-stalked lepiota    
Marasmius fulvoferrugeneus      
Marasmius rotula Pinwheel Marasmius    
Marasmius siccus Orange Pinwheel Marasmius f  
Marasmius sullivantii   f  
Megacollybia rodmani Broad Gill   x
Mycena pura Pink Mycena    
Tapinella atrotomentosus = Paxillus atrotomentosus Velvet-foot Pax   x
Phylloporus rhodoxanthus Gilled Bolete   x
Phellinus sp.      
Pleurotus ostreatus complex Oyster   x
Ramaria sp.      
Resinomycena rhododendri   f  
Retiboletus ornatipes = Boletus ornatipes Ornate-stalked Bolete    
Russula virescens Green Quilt Russula   x
Sparassis spathulata Cauliflower   x
Stemonitis sp. (slime mold) f  
Stereum complicatum Crowded Parchment    
Stereum ostrea False Turkey Tail   x
Trametes versicolor Turkey Tail   x
Trichaptum biforme Violet Toothed Polypore    
Tubifera sp. (slime mold) f  
Tylopilus plumbeoviolaceus Violet Bitter Bolete   x
Tylopilus rubrobrunneus      
Tylopilus variobrunneus      
Tyromyces caesius White Cheese Polypore    
Xanthoconium separans      
Xeromphalina campanella Fuzzy Foot    
Total Species: 58   7 13

Foray Location: Chimney Rock State Park, the “Great Woodland Adventure Trail” and nearby forest.

Foray Habitat and Weather: The area visited has some of the oldest undisturbed forest in the Park, primarily mixed hardwoods on a gentle to moderate slope. The weather was warm and humid. There had been below average rainfall in the region in the previous few weeks, followed by some heavy showers in the week leading up to the foray.

Summary: Twenty-five members took part in the foray. The program was arranged in advance with the park staff. We arrived in the park around 10:00 AM and forayed from 10:30 to noon. After eating lunch we drove or took the shuttle bus up to the main parking area near the top of the park and started to set out our specimens on tables outside the “birdhouse” – a pleasantly shaded area close to the start of two trails. Other visitors to the park immediately started to gather around and ask questions about our mushrooms. Eventually over 60 species were on the table. Meanwhile Ginger Fisher set up a table near the park’s Gift Shop with children’s activities: a mushroom quiz and mushrooms specimens to draw and color and to try to identify from the main display.

Large fleshy fungi and favorite edibles were not as plentiful as we had hoped but many smaller species were collected, including some interesting slime molds. Thanks to Coleman’s efforts 50 species were identified seven of which were new to our cumulative species list. The slime molds were identified to genus only but all three genera were first-time collections for the club.

This foray was our first at Chimney Rock – a park which is normally “off-limits” for collecting. The park staff were very pleased with the scientific and educational aspects of our visit and we can count on repeating the foray in future years.


Oconee State Park Foray

Species Common Name New to AMC Top 50
Amanita abrupta Peck Abrupt-Bulbed Lepidella    
Amanita amerifulva Tulloss nom. prov. = Amanita fulva sensu auct. amer. Tawny Grisette   x
Amanita brunnescens G.F. Atk. Brown American Star-footed Amanita    
Amanita farinosa Schwein. Eastern American Flowery Amanita    
Amanita flavoconia G. F. Atk. var. flavoconia Yellow Patches   x
Amanita hesleri Bas Hesler's Lepidella x  
Amanita onusta (Howe) Sacc. Gunpowder Lepidella    
Amanita parcivolvata (Peck) J.E. Gilbert Ringless False Fly Agaric    
Amanita pelioma Bas Bruising Lepidella    
Amanita polypyramis (Berk. & M.A. Curtis) Sacc. Plateful of Pyramids Lepidella    
Amanita ravenelii (B&C) Sacc. Ravenel's Lepidella    
Amanita sp. (NC-AM-34)   x  
Amanita spreta (Peck) Sacc. Hated Caesar's Amanita    
Amanita subcokeri (Tulloss nom. prov.) = Amanita sp. 5 False Coker's Lepidella    
Austroboletus gracilis var gracilis (Pk.) Wolfe Graceful Bolete    
Beauveria sp. an insect pathogen x  
Bjerkandera adusta (Willd.) P. Karst Smoky Polypore    
Boletellus ananas (M.A. Curtis) Murrill Shaggy Cap Bolete x  
Boletus auriflammeus Berk. & M.A. Curtis      
Boletus auriporus Pk.      
Boletus curtisii Berk. Curtis' Bolete    
Boletus innixus Frost Clustered Brown Bolete    
Boletus longicurvipes Snell & Smith      
Boletus pallidoroseus Both   x  
Boletus roxanae Frost      
Bondarzewia berkeleyi (Fr.) Bondartsev & Singer Berkeley's Polypore    
Buchwaldoboletus hemichrysus (Berk. & M.A. Curtis) Pil�t = Pulvuleroboletus hemichrysus   x  
Calostoma cinnabarina Desv. Gelatinous Stalked Puffball   x
Cantharellus cibarius Fr. Gilled Yellow Chanterelle   x
Cantharellus cinnabarinus Schw. Cinnabar Chanterelle   x
Chlorociboria aeruginascens (Nyl.) Kanouse ex C.S. Ramamurthi, Blue-green Wood Stain    
Clavaria rubicundula Leathers Smoky Worm Coral    
Clavaria vermicularis Batsch White Worm Coral; Fairy Fingers    
Clavariadelphus pistillaris (L.) Donk Pestle-shaped Coral    
Clavulinopsis aurantiocinnabarina (Schw.) Corner Orange Spindle Coral    
Cordyceps militaris (L.) Link Trooping Cordyceps    
Cortinarius distans Peck Brown Cortinarius x  
Craterellus cornucopioides (L.) Pers Black Trumpet   x
Crepidotus applanatus (Pers.) P. Kumm Flat Crep    
Cyathus striatus (Huds.) Willd. Bird's Nest Fungus    
Dacrymyces palmatus (Schw.) Bres. Orange Jelly Fungus    
Dacryopinax spathularia (Schwein.) G.W. Martin      
Daedaleopsis confragosa (Bolton) J. Schr�t. Thick-maze Oak Polypore   x
Erynia sepulchralis (Thaxt.) Remaud. & Henneber = Entomophthora sepulchralis   x  
Fistulina hepatica (Schaeff.) With. Beef Steak Mushroom   x
Fomitopsis cajanderi (P. Karst.) Kotl. & Pouzar Rosy Conk    
Ganoderma applanatum (Pers.) Pat. Artist's Conk    
Ganoderma lucidum (Curtis) P. Karst. Reishi    
Gibellula sp. (a pathogen of spiders) x  
Gymnopus iocephalus (Berk. & M.A. Curtis) Halling Violet Collybia    
Gymnopus subnudus (Ellis ex Peck) Halling      
Heimioporus betula (Schwein.) E. Horak = Astroboletus betula Shaggy stalk Bolete   x
Hericium coralloides (Scop.) Pers. Bear's Head Tooth; Comb Tooth    
Humidicutis marginata (Peck) Singer = Hygrophorus marginatus var marginatus Orange-gilled Waxy Cap    
Hydnellum aurantiacum (Batsch) P. Karst      
Hymenopellis furfuraceae (Peck) Redhead et al. = Xerula furfuracea      
Hymenopellis incognita (Methven & R.H. Petersen) = Xerula incognita   x  
Hypomyces chrysospermus Tul. Golden hypomyces    
Hypomyces hyalinus (Schwein.) Tul. & C. Tul. Parasitizes Amanitas    
Hypomyces lactifluorum (Schwein.) Tul. & C. Tul. Lobster   x
Laccaria ochropurpurea (Berk.) Peck Purple Gilled Laccaria   x
Laccaria sp.      
Lactarius allardii Coker      
Lactarius corrugis Peck Corrugated Milky   x
Lactarius gerardii Peck Gerard's Mikly    
Lactarius glaucescens Crossl. Green Staining Peppery Milk Cap x  
Lactarius indigo (Schw.) Fr. Indigo Lactarius    
Lactarius salmoneus Peck   x  
Lactarius volemus (Fr.) Fr     x
Laetiporus sulphureus (Bull) Murr. Chicken of the Woods   x
Lasiosphaeria ovina (Pers.) Ces. & De Not   x  
Lentinus levis (Berk. & M.A. Curtis) Murrill = Pleurotus levis   x  
Lenzites betulina (L.) Fr. Gilled Polypore    
Lenzites elegans (Spreng.) Pat.= Trametes elegans      
Leucopaxillus giganteus (Sowerby) Singer Giant Clitocybe    
Marasmiellus opacus (Berk. & M.A. Curtis) Singer      
Marasmiellus praecutis (Ell.) Halling   x  
Megacollybia rodmanii J.L. Mata, Aime & T.W. Henkel Broad Gilled Mushroom   x
Micromphale foetidum (Sowerby) Singer Fetid Marasmius    
Microporellus obovatus (Jungh.) Ryvarden   x  
Neolentinus lepideus (Fr.) Redhead & Ginns The Train Wrecker x  
Nolanea strictia (Peck) Largent Straight-stalked Entoloma    
Omphalotus illudens (Schwein.) Bresinsky & Besl Jack-O'- Lantern Mushroom   x
Panellus stipticus (Bull.) P. Karst. Luminescent Panellus    
Phaeocalicium polyporaeum (Nyl.) Tibell Small stalked parasitic fungus on Trichaptum biforme x  
Phaeolus schweinitzii (Fr.) Pat. Dyer's Polypore    
Phellinus robiniae (Murrill) A. Ames      
Phellodon niger (Fr.) Karst Black Tooth x  
Pholiota squarrosoides (Pk.) Sacc. Scaled Pholiota    
Phylloporus rhodoxanthus (Schwein.) Bres. Gilled Bolete    
Pisolithus arhizus (Scop.) Rauschert = P. tinctorius (Pers.) Coker & Couch Dye-Makers False Puffball    
Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq.) P. Kumm. Oyster Mushroom   x
Pleurotus pulmonarius (Fr.) Qu�l. Summer Oyster    
Pseudomerulius curtisii (Berk.) Redhead & Ginns      
Pulveroboletus ravenelii (B & C) Murr. Ravenel's Bolete    
Punctularia strigosozonata (Schwein.) P.H.B. Talbot   x  
Retiboletus griseus (Frost) Manfr. Binder & Bresinsky = Boletus griseus      
Retiboletus ornatipes (Peck) Manfr. Binder & Bresinsky = Boletus ornatipes Ornate Stalked Bolete    
Russula compacta Frost Firm Russula   x
Russula flavida Frost      
Russula variata Banning Variable Russula    
Scleroderma polyrhizum (J. F. Gmel.) Pers.      
Scleroderma citrinum Pers. Common Earth Ball   x
Sparassis crispa (Wulfen) Fr. Cauliflower Mushroom   x
Stereum ostrea (Blume & T. Nees) Fr. False Turkey Tail    
Stereum rameale (Schwein.) Burt = S. complicatum Goldern Parchment Fungus    
Strobilomyces confusus Singer or S. strobilaceus (Scop.) Berk. Old Man of the Woods   x
Strobilurus conigenoides (Ellis) Singer      
Suillus americanus (Pk.) Snell Chicken Fat Suillus    
Suillus granulatus (Fr.) Kuntze Butterball Mushroom   x
Suillus pictus (Peck) A.H. Sm. & Thiers Painted Suillus   x
Suillus salmonicolor (Frost) Halling      
Tapinella atrotomentosa (Batsch) ?utara = Paxillus atrotomentosus Velvet-footed Paxillus   x
Thelephora terrestris Ehrh. Common Fiber Vase x  
Trametes versicolor (L.) Lloyd Turkey Tail Fungus   x
Trichaptum abietinum (Dicks.) Ryvarden      
Trichaptum biforme (Fr.) Ryvarden Violet-Toothed Polypore    
Trichoglossum hirsutum (Fr.) Boud. Velvety Earth Tongue    
Tricholomopsis decora (Fr.) Singer Decorated Mop    
Tyromyces chioneus (Fr.) Karsten White Cheese Polypore    
Xeromphalina kauffmani A.H. Smith      
Xylaria magnoliae J. D. Rogers Magnolia Cone Xylaria    
Xylobolus frustulatus (Pers.) Boidin Ceramic Parchment    
Xylobolus subpileatus (Berk. & M.A. Curtis) Boidin   x  
124   22 25

We had a full house in the barracks, and most of the cabins were rented by our group, and some folks set up home away from home in the campground.

This year had the largest attendance yet at 69. Some rain had fallen recently, but not in the previous week. Friday was a dry day, with Saturday afternoon producing a little rain, but not enough to dampen the spirits of all the folks walking on their forays and collecting.

On Friday evening we had a presentation by Dr. Coleman McCleneghan titled, “The World of Fungi: an ecological look at some of our Carolina Fungi" This talk explored the ultimate question; "Is it Edible?" and took a look at what roles these fungi are playing in the ecosystem.

Saturday evening, after a gourmet pot luck dinner, a silent auction was held that netted, along with registration fees, a sufficient amount of money to pay all the expenses of the weekend. It was followed by a presentation by Jay Justice who spoke about “The ABCs of Macrofungi: Newly described species of Amanitas, Botetes and Chanterelles in the SE US”. Jay issued us a challenge to keep up with all the name changes of fungi as more and more species have their DNA mapped. We ended our evening with Appalachian style entertainment from Todd and Doug Elliott along with Steve, Toni, and Addie Roberts and Matt Walter.

On Sunday we were treated to a walk around the tables, with Jay and Coleman pointing out the most important features of the fungi found so we might be able to identify them in the field.

Because of the dry conditions we did not see the profusion of mushrooms that were fruiting in previous years and some collections were not exactly in prime condition. But thanks to our dedicated ID team we ended up with 124 species, including 22 not previously recorded by the club. These included several insect parasites unearthed (sometimes literally) by Todd Elliott.

Oconee continues to amaze us with its fungal variety and unpredictability. In three years, we have collected 257 species. Only 21 of these (8%) turned up in all three years and 72 species (28%) were found twice. The vast majority (64%) were collected only in one year, despite the fact that we were re-visiting the same locations at the same time of year.


North Mills River Foray
Date: October 2, 2010 / Leaders: Arnie Cremer & Charlotte Caplan

Species Common Name First AMC record Top 50
Amanita bisporigera Destroying Angel   x
Amanita citrina Citron Amanita    
"Amanita fulva" Tawny Crisette   x
Armillaria mellea Honey Mushroom   x
Calostoma cinnabarina Gelatinous Stalked Puffball   x
Calostoma lutescens      
Chroogomphus vinicolor Wine Cap F  
Clavaria fumosa Yellow-tipped coral    
Daedaliopsis confragosa Thin Maze Polypore   x
Entoloma abortivum Aborted entoloma   x
Grifola frondosa Hen of the Woods   x
Hypholoma fasciculare Sulphur Tuft    
Hypomyces lactifluorum Lobster   x
Hypomyces luteovirens Yellow-green hypomyces    
Hypsizygus ulmarius = Pleurotus ulmarius Elm Oyster F  
Lactarius peckii Peck's Milk Cap   x
Lactarius vinaceorufescens Yellow-staining Milk Cap    
Lactarius volemus Apricot Milk Cap   x
Laetiporus sulphureus Chicken of the Woods   x
Lenzites betulina Gilled Polypore    
Lycogala epidendron Wolf's milk Slime    
Lycoperdon perlatum Gem-studded puffball   x
Phaeolus schweinitzii Dyers' polypore    
Polyporus badius Bay-colored polypore    
Pycnoporus cinnabarina Cinnabar Polypore    
Russula brevipes Short-stalked Russula    
Russula compacta Firm Russula   x
Sparassis crispa Cauliflower   x
Stereum complicatum Crowded parchment    
Stereum ostrea False Turkey Tail    
Suillus granulatus Ditted-stalk Suillus   x
Tapinella atrotomentosa = Paxillus atrotomentosus Velvet-footed Pax   x
Trametes versicolor Turkey Tail   x
Tricholoma caligatum = Armillaria caligata Booted Tricholoma    
Tricholoma sejunctum Separated Trich    
Tyromyces chioneus White cheese polypore    
Xerula furfuracea Rooting agaric   x
total species count = 37   2 18

Foray Location: Starting from Trace Ridge trailhead one group forayed along the North Fork of the Mills River and another group went down Trace Ridge Trail returning along the south end of Wash Creek trail.

Foray Habitat and Weather: The trails run through mixed forests near the creeks and areas dominated by white pine on the dryer ridges. The day was cool and bright. About 2 inches of rain had fallen the previous weekend, following an extended period of above average temperatures and below average rainfall.

Summary: This foray – the last one of the year – was well-attended with 26 members taking part. We forayed from about 10:00 AM to noon. The road down to and along the river proved to be a better collecting area than the trail to the south, which was dominated by pines. A reasonable variety of fungi were present, though many were in poor condition. We collected well over 40 species and identified 37 species. 18 of these were on the “Top 50” list, including several typical fall species. The most abundant was the Honey Mushroom, Armillaria mellea, including one fruiting associated with masses of Aborted Entoloma, Entoloma abortivum. Other good edibles found were Hen of the Woods, Grifola frondosa, and the Cauliflower, Sparrasis crispa.. Two species proved to be new finds for the Club: Chroogomphus vinicolor (Wine Cap) was found scattered under the white pines and Hypsizygus ulmarius (Elm Oyster) was collected from a hardwood log (it may possibly have been the less common Hypsizygus tessulatus).